Newspaper articles about teenage dating

"In addition to clarifying potential long-term impacts of teen dating violence victimization, our study highlights the importance of talking to all adolescents about dating and dating violence," Exner-Cortens said."This includes prioritizing teen dating violence screening during clinical visits and developing health care-based interventions for responding to adolescents who are in unhealthy relationships, in order to help reduce future health problems in these teens." Study co-authors are John Eckenrode, Cornell professor of human development and director of the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, and Emily Rothman at the Boston University School of Public Health.D., MPH, MS, the study’s lead author and a U-M clinical lecturer in the Departments of Emergency Medicine and Family Medicine.

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“Especially in the teen years, when young people are figuring out their relationship roles, changing partners more often than adults, and likely not living together.” His colleagues and co-authors on the new study, Maureen Walton, Ph. Singh, Walton and Cunningham are all members of the U-M Institute for Healthcare Policy and Innovation.

D., MPH, of the U-M Department of Psychiatry, and Injury Center director Rebecca Cunningham, M. Cunningham and Stoddard both hold appointments in the U-M School of Public Health.

D., of the U-M Department of Emergency Medicine, are testing a behavioral intervention tool in urban emergency departments that aims to help teens understand how to reduce violence of all kinds in their lives. Funding for the study came from National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse (grant AA018122, with additional support from the U-M injury Center, which is supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (grant 5R49CE002099).

Singh also co-wrote guidance on screening for intimate partner violence for primary care providers, published in the June issue of Singh urges all teens, and those who love them, to be aware of phone and online resources that can help them identify and respond to unhealthy tendencies in their relationships – and get help when things threaten to turn violent.

While the researchers didn’t ask about the gender of the teen’s partner or about emotional or sexual abuse, the new data give new insight into teen dating violence that builds on school-based and smaller healthcare-based studies.

Last modified 28-Jun-2017 14:57